100 KX100 top end rebuild

I haven't gotten what you call a bad piston in a very long time, and never have with a two stroke. I have had plenty of bad results though. If you are going to run a cylinder that is a little bit on the loose side, go for the forged variety. Chances are a little bit less that you will rattle the skirts off of them. Your cylinder likely will seat your new rings easier if it is honed or scotch brite scoured. When I hone a two stroke cylinder I usually do it in water or with a flow of water running through the cylinder. To keep from doing the "funky chicken" that means I use a rechargeable drill. But if I am going to watch someone else do it, I hand them a Milwaukee that I bought in 1976. I use an aluminum oxide ball hone about 200 grit and small enough that I can insert it into the cylinder and then shake it and have it fall out. I take out all the powervalve stuff before I hone it fyi. it gets a good power washing and if you can get away with it, just run it through your parents diswasher (you had been saying you wanted to move out). Anyway, clean it really good, rub the bore down a few times with atf and paper towels. Ready to reinstall. FYI I don't run the hone down over the ports. Don't use the hone to try to clean out aluminum. (Use muriatic acid if aluminum is stuck to the cylinder walls.)
 
Alright boys let's here your bad experiences with certain brands

I've had melt downs with both. Thats a maintenance issue.
I've had OEMs shatter.
I've had casts shatter.
This are still maintanence issues since I've had more than 15 hrs on each piston. At the time rings every 10 hrs, Pistons every 20.
I prefer wiseco over oem due to the fact I feel comfortable putting 40hrs on a wiseco.
That being said, my 91 kx80 still has the stock piston in it from the show room. I bought it 93 from a kid who bought it ride it twice and parked it. As a matter of fact everything is oem except tires,oil, bars and grips. It's estimated at around 1800 hrs.
 
I kid Floyd about still being on his original bath.
Well, when I was little, and being #8 in the Palmer brats bunch, I was lucky to have water that wasn't 1 of 3 things, dirty from everyone else, full of piss, and/or pooped in. Can't understand why I am imune to everything. :smirk:
 
I have great luck and always have (starting with a 1968 Bridgestone) with a hone. You just have to be selective on which one you use (I mention the one that I like above. but who reads?) If you don't have access to 15 dollars or the one mentioned and have enough patience you can use a few scotch bright pads. Again, if there is aluminum on the cylinder surface you will have to remove it with acid. the scotchbright pads just mask it being there. Some lighter emery cloths etc will work, but then you have to deal with cleaning off something that is more abrasive than the hone mentioned is.
Is there any other way to go about cleaning up my cylinder other than getting a hone
 
I have great luck and always have (starting with a 1968 Bridgestone) with a hone. You just have to be selective on which one you use (I mention the one that I like above. but who reads?) If you don't have access to 15 dollars or the one mentioned and have enough patience you can use a few scotch bright pads. Again, if there is aluminum on the cylinder surface you will have to remove it with acid. the scotchbright pads just mask it being there. Some lighter emery cloths etc will work, but then you have to deal with cleaning off something that is more abrasive than the hone mentioned is.

I was taught to never use a ball hone on plated cylinders as it chips the ports. I've heard from Wiseco the only hone to actually use is a rigid hone which I think is a diamond scraper blade..... I'm sure PowerSeal uses that to true the plating application.
 
Hell, don't take my word for it. try eric gorr. harry klemm. So far I haven't found anyone at wiseco that answers the phone that does anything besides answer the phone. why is it you would hone the port area? I have the hardest time imagining the rings needing to seat there. Take and old cylinder, run a ball hone through it and TRY to hurt some of the ports. If you reread my suggestion on sizing the hone to begin with, you will be able to amaze me by doing so. The rigid hone is a nice way to take out some plating if that is the desire. All an aluminum oxide hone will do is clean the glaze off of the old hone marks, though the hone will make you think you have new hash marks as it leaves them in the glazed surface. It is alike cleaning your cylinder with ajax on a spinning rag.
 
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