Tire tubes, heavy duty or ultra heavy duty

Reading a tube thread on another forum got me thinking about different tubes. Most riders go with the ultra heavy duty tube, 'cuz thicker is better, right? Well, most tube punctures I have had are nails or other metal objects, the UHD tubes didn't stop them. Pinch flats are another problem, but the heavy duty tubes seem to prevent better than standard thickness, not sure if UHD's are more protection against pinch flats.
Two problems I find with UHD's are little harder to install due to more bulk, and weigh more. Unsprung weight does affect handling much more than most riders realize, especially when running a heavy back tire such as a Maxxis or Gritty. Shaving as much unsprung weight off the wheels makes a huge difference in handling. I have been running Bridgestone Heavy Duty tubes for the past year, still average a couple of flats a year, but not more than when running the UHD's.
So, an informal poll, is the weight saving of a lighter tube offset the small gain of the UHD's? Just looking to make the riding experience as trouble free as possible.
 
If you are a fast maniacal type rider then pinch flats are a big problem and UHD's do help some. No tube can take a strong pinch from a high speed hit. I generally don't run the UHD's and knowing how you ride I doubt you would gain from them.

I usually run just HD tubes.
 
I run HD, but I never get out of second gear. I did just put UHD in the front of my sons 85XC, he seems to get plenty of front flats. :picard:
 
the best thing you can run is a bib mousse foam insert. http://www.motorcycle-superstore.co...-Mousse-Flat-Proof-Competition-Foam-Tube.aspx
you can stick a nail in it you can do what ever and it wont pop because its just foam and it makes it feel like your running 10psi. i haven't run them because they are out of my prise range but i have talked to a lot of people that do and they love them. i run the nuetech tubliss system and it works good havent had any flats with them. http://www.nuetech.com/
 
A good trick to try is take a standard tube (the one that came with bike or an old pinched one) and cut it with scissors round the inside and around the valve steam removing it. Take either a standard tube or HD tube and inflate the tube. Baby power it up and then wrap the cut tube around it giving it another skin. Baby powder that tube and place in wheel. I ran this for years while competitively trail riding and my flats went from a regular basis to almost nothing...........:thumb: Happy :ride:
 

James

Staff member
Good advice CDA. :thumb:
the best thing you can run is a bib mousse foam insert. http://www.motorcycle-superstore.co...-Mousse-Flat-Proof-Competition-Foam-Tube.aspx
you can stick a nail in it you can do what ever and it wont pop because its just foam and it makes it feel like your running 10psi. i haven't run them because they are out of my prise range but i have talked to a lot of people that do and they love them. i run the nuetech tubliss system and it works good havent had any flats with them. http://www.nuetech.com/
Unless I just didn't read that right, you can't adjust the tire pressure with the foam insert?

IMO Nuetech Tubeless looks like a better system, I really like the 3ish pounds you lose in the unsprung weight. :ride:
 
Reading a tube thread on another forum got me thinking about different tubes. Most riders go with the ultra heavy duty tube, 'cuz thicker is better, right? Well, most tube punctures I have had are nails or other metal objects, the UHD tubes didn't stop them. Pinch flats are another problem, but the heavy duty tubes seem to prevent better than standard thickness, not sure if UHD's are more protection against pinch flats.
Two problems I find with UHD's are little harder to install due to more bulk, and weigh more. Unsprung weight does affect handling much more than most riders realize, especially when running a heavy back tire such as a Maxxis or Gritty. Shaving as much unsprung weight off the wheels makes a huge difference in handling. I have been running Bridgestone Heavy Duty tubes for the past year, still average a couple of flats a year, but not more than when running the UHD's.
So, an informal poll, is the weight saving of a lighter tube offset the small gain of the UHD's? Just looking to make the riding experience as trouble free as possible.
I do the UHD's, and with running slightly higher then normal air pressure, my flats have been at a minimum. All of this low air pressure/unsprung weight is wasted on this low skilled rider :noidea:
 
On the neutech system and a nail or cacti prong the outer tire inflation is done! A great system but not worth it IMO. My flats have been minimum since riding and like Tim, unsprung weight is useless to a non-skilled person. :thinking:
 
On the neutech system and a nail or cacti prong the outer tire inflation is done! A great system but not worth it IMO. My flats have been minimum since riding and like Tim, unsprung weight is useless to a non-skilled person. :thinking:
yes u cant change the pressure. iv been happy with the tubeless it makes the side walls even stiffer in the turns which helps a lot. i hardly ever get flats the reason i got the tubeless is because of performance. helps so much with tire changes!!!!! if any1 is interested in the tubeless i can give my buddy a shout and hook yall up.
 
On the neutech system and a nail or cacti prong the outer tire inflation is done! A great system but not worth it IMO. My flats have been minimum since riding and like Tim, unsprung weight is useless to a non-skilled person. :thinking:
I have two pro rider friends that run the tubeless set up and neither one has ever got a flat in the last two years they have run the system. If you do get a flat all you need is a plug kit and some air. No need to remove tire or any of that crap. There are way more bonuses to this setup than there are problems.
 
A good trick to try is take a standard tube (the one that came with bike or an old pinched one) and cut it with scissors round the inside and around the valve steam removing it. Take either a standard tube or HD tube and inflate the tube. Baby power it up and then wrap the cut tube around it giving it another skin. Baby powder that tube and place in wheel. I ran this for years while competitive trail riding and my flats went from a regular basis to almost nothing...........:thumb: Happy :ride:
Hmmmmmmm...:thinking:
 
A good trick to try is take a standard tube (the one that came with bike or an old pinched one) and cut it with scissors round the inside and around the valve steam removing it. Take either a standard tube or HD tube and inflate the tube. Baby power it up and then wrap the cut tube around it giving it another skin. Baby powder that tube and place in wheel. I ran this for years while competitively trail riding and my flats went from a regular basis to almost nothing...........:thumb: Happy :ride:
A friend taught me once to duck tape the inside of the wheel in addition to the HD Tube. Seems to work pretty damn well.
 
I have two pro rider friends that run the tubeless set up and neither one has ever got a flat in the last two years they have run the system. If you do get a flat all you need is a plug kit and some air. No need to remove tire or any of that crap. There are way more bonuses to this setup than there are problems.
Spoken like a true salesman! :prof: :moon: :hug:

I have 5,400 miles on my Husky and the same tubes, I think four front tires and I need to take my shoes off to count how many rears. :P Seen the video on the system, I'll stick to the old fashion way of running the wheels. tires and tubes. :thumb:
 
A friend taught me once to duck tape the inside of the wheel in addition to the HD Tube. Seems to work pretty damn well.
:thinking: Aw a pretty wise friend you have there. Yes, a bead of duct tape twice around the inside over the spokes is a great added bonus to keep the spokes from poking the tube if they come loose.
 
Spoken like a true salesman! :prof: :moon: :hug:

I have 5,400 miles on my Husky and the same tubes, I think four front tires and I need to take my shoes off to count how many rears. :P Seen the video on the system, I'll stick to the old fashion way of running the wheels. tires and tubes. :thumb:
:thinking: Aw a pretty wise friend you have there. Yes, a bead of duct tape twice around the inside over the spokes is a great added bonus to keep the spokes from poking the tube if they come loose.
What about taping the inside ofthe tire since the tubes expand when you pump them up? I would think it would have the same effect correct? :thinking:
 
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