Make another happy SOB!

Guess what! My parents are paying for me to take Penn Foster online mechanics class. Once I'm finished and if I have over a 70% in the class I will be a certified motorcycle and quad runner mechanic. With a licenes to work on bikes commercially. I'll be able to get a job when I'm 16 as a mechanic too at a local shop. Why may you ask? I decided to go for motorcycle mechanics as a lifetime career, I studied into it and this is the other way I can go. I was told by a licenens mechanic that MMI puts monkeys through and people don't want to hire them. Anyhow, just thought I'de share the good news!
 
:thumb: I can't wait, I want to eventually open my own shop. Getting started early is my only hope. I'll volenteer around local shop for a few years, then when I'm 16, ask to get on the payroll. Get some more experiance, save money, then buy a building and get started! My parents think it's a good investment and want to pay for it for me since it's what I love and can put it to use since there is 3 bikes in the family. Then tons more of friends.
 
I'm getting physced on this
-8 month class
-work on street bikes, dirtbike, atvs
-as soon as I garaduate High school I can get a job anywhere if not before
-ill know everything about my bike
-i can make a little money as time goes on, mabey enough to cover all track expenses helping out at shops
-i will know all :prof: :lol: they leave nothing out
 
I'm getting physced on this
-8 month class
-work on street bikes, dirtbike, atvs
-as soon as I garaduate High school I can get a job anywhere if not before
-ill know everything about my bike
-i can make a little money as time goes on, mabey enough to cover all track expenses helping out at shops
-i will know all :prof: :lol: they leave nothing out
Plenty of time for work. Think about going to college for the business classes you are going to need. You need to think long term :prof:. A college education will come in handy down the road. Like I said before, plenty of time to work.
 
Google Rossinni Racing.
He's an old local pro that started his own shop now he builds race car motors for serious $$$$$$$$!
 
it would be an excellent job and then a part time as you go to school, living the dream for a kid. My dad owned a Yam shop and I went to live with him for the summer. Raced two days a week, worked in the shop, left after the summer with my new bike, it was glorious.
 
Great thinking to planning ahead :thumb: I was thinking of doing this too awhile back, ill give you some tips that I found when I was researching it. First you have to ask yourself if I work on motorcycles everyday and come home am i going to want to work on my own? Most likely not. Another thing is, look at the way the economy is going, most bike shops I know locally are going in the whole because no one can really afford it, but of course that may differ in california, but being a local mechanic in California is hard too because of the cost of living. Also what happens when mechanics doesn't work out for you? Now your going to have to go to college to get a degree in something sorta universal and half the time your burn out by that time. I was also thinking about running my own shop too, questions to ask yourself are do I want to devote all of my time into that? The first few years are going to be rough just to even get your name out. You won't have time or money to even ride during those times. Also if you ever have a family you won't see them that much either. A business degree like mentioned above will also almost be mandatory. I'm not trying to discourage you, just some tips from my research. If you stay dedicated you can accomplish anything in life :prof:
 
Also just because you are certified doesn't mean your guaranteed a job because think of how many other people are competing for the same job
 
Awesome news YD! :thumb: don't ignore your other studies :prof:
Indeed, I'm not starting until after SATs, by then teacher give up for the year.
it would be an excellent job and then a part time as you go to school, living the dream for a kid. My dad owned a Yam shop and I went to live with him for the summer. Raced two days a week, worked in the shop, left after the summer with my new bike, it was glorious.
That's what I'm hoping for! No doubt in my mind about it.
Great thinking to planning ahead :thumb: I was thinking of doing this too awhile back, ill give you some tips that I found when I was researching it. First you have to ask yourself if I work on motorcycles everyday and come home am i going to want to work on my own? Most likely not. Another thing is, look at the way the economy is going, most bike shops I know locally are going in the whole because no one can really afford it, but of course that may differ in california, but being a local mechanic in California is hard too because of the cost of living. Also what happens when mechanics doesn't work out for you? Now your going to have to go to college to get a degree in something sorta universal and half the time your burn out by that time. I was also thinking about running my own shop too, questions to ask yourself are do I want to devote all of my time into that? The first few years are going to be rough just to even get your name out. You won't have time or money to even ride during those times. Also if you ever have a family you won't see them that much either. A business degree like mentioned above will also almost be mandatory. I'm not trying to discourage you, just some tips from my research. If you stay dedicated you can accomplish anything in life :prof: Also just because you are certified doesn't mean your guaranteed a job because think of how many other people are competing for the same job
I understand your points. Suprisingly despite all over the economic problems, the local shops are succeding. Really I just want to be able to work part time to make money so I can live the dream of going to the track multipul times a week and adding a new after market part on once a month. If I am able to do well and am making money after I'm out of high school then I'll stick with it for sure, if I'm not, then I'll change over and get into something else, I have a few ideas. Plus even if it means I don't want to work on my bike, then I'll have the knowledge how to fix it and won't have to worry about farther screwing stuff up and depending on a manual. I also know just because I'm certified doesn't mean I'm gonna have a garentee job, but if I'm willing to volenteer for a few years at local shops washing bikes for resale, sweeping the floors and telling people where stuff is then when I'm 16, I have a better chance than someone who's fresh out of school trying to find a job with no experiance what so ever. I'll also have an opportuinty to observe mechanics and pick up pro tricks :thumb:
 
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