Knee Injuries and the Use of Prophylactic Knee Bracing in Off-road Motorcycling

James

Staff member
"Are knee braces really worth it?"


You've probably asked that question before and until now there's been no scientific study on this topic.



Knee Injuries and the Use of Prophylactic Knee Bracing in Off-road Motorcycling: Results of a Large-Scale Epidemiological Study
Mark S. Sanders, MD - Robert A. Cates, BA - Michael D. Baker, BS - Sue D. Barber-Westin, BS - Wesley M. Gladin, BS - Martin S. Levy, PhD
The American Journal of Sports Medicine Source


Background: The effectiveness of prophylactic knee bracing in preventing knee injuries during sports has been evaluated; however, because of the variability in study conclusions, the topic remains controversial. Despite a paucity of data, the authors believe that prophylactic knee bracing is frequently used in off-road motorcycling.

Hypothesis: No statistically significant difference exists in the frequency and types of knee injuries incurred between braced and nonbraced riders using commercially available knee braces in off-road motorcycling.

Study Design: Descriptive epidemiology study.

Methods: Data from 2115 off-road motorcycle riders was obtained using an Internet-based survey over a 1-year period. Participants were grouped by use or nonuse of prophylactic knee bracing, and an incidence rate ratio was used for injury rate comparison.

Results: Participants recorded 39 611 riding hours over the study period. A total of 57 riders (2.7%) sustained at least 1 knee injury, for a total of 89 injuries. The most common injuries involved the anterior cruciate ligament, menisci, and medial collateral ligament. There was a significantly higher rate of overall injuries in the nonbraced group versus the braced group (3.675 vs 1.587 per 1000 rider hours, P < .001). Significantly higher incidence rates of anterior cruciate ligament rupture (1.518 vs 0.701 per 1000 rider hours, P = .0274) and medial collateral ligament injury (0.799 vs 0.111 per 1000 rider hours, P = .002) were found among nonbraced riders compared with braced riders.

Conclusion: The most common knee injuries in off-road motorcycling involve the anterior cruciate ligament, menisci, and medial collateral ligament. The use of prophylactic knee bracing appears to have a beneficial effect in preventing medial collateral ligament and anterior cruciate ligament injuries as well as overall knee injury occurrence. These findings may be applicable to other sports that involve similar forces and mechanics.


Due to copyright issues please don't copy this post/article.
 
Good post James. :thumb: Hopefully, this will help put to bed the ongoing debate about use/non-use of knee braces. Was this Dr. Mark's study by chance?
 
Due to copyright issues please don't copy this post/article.
This is really only the abstract. Usually there is no problem with copying it. The whole paper will be many pages long and will contain a lot more data and a lot of explanation on how the data was gathered and analyzed.

If you recognize the first name of the group, Mark S. Sanders, MD, he is the doc guy over at TT. I'm sure that a large chunk of the participants were from TT since they asked for volunteers over there.

There is a link to the full paper here http://tinyurl.com/4eydyl2
 

James

Staff member
This is really only the abstract. Usually there is no problem with copying it. The whole paper will be many pages long and will contain a lot more data and a lot of explanation on how the data was gathered and analyzed.

If you recognize the first name of the group, Mark S. Sanders, MD, he is the doc guy over at TT. I'm sure that a large chunk of the participants were from TT since they asked for volunteers over there.
Yup and yup.

BTW the notice is because a source link needs to be included and I don't want my lawyer calling me. :thumb:
 
So, the doc puts out his own abstract, on what the majority of the medical community has already known and practiced for years based off of studies done on other high-impact sports... brilliant. :rolleyes: Now, all he needs is a confimation study backing his bi-lateral blow jobs. :smirk: Not bashing you or your post James :thumb: (one year anniversary of my injury today, currently riding braced), just not a fan of the Hacker. Studies like these have been conducted for football, skiing, etc., light years ago. All it's saying, is it specifically targets this sport. Seems like overkill on what has been widely recognized and accepted as standard of practice by ortho's treating patients who plan to return to high level sports following a significant ligament/knee injury. My hubs was done 20 years ago, was braced for skiing and cutting type sports. All the research done on this topic through the years is how/why they've developed professional sports braces such as, DonJoy, CTI, Bledsoe, etc.

Maybe the good doc is working on a patent for his custom dual braces for his... :foul:... nope, not going there. Sorry, he ticks me off :rant:, can you tell. :lol:


Seriously, I hope this study will motivate more riders to move towards making a good brace/guard combo a staple in their riding gear, as preventative knee support. After going through a severe knee injury, it's not something you want to experience and doesn't take much force, twisting, or impact to blow your knee out. And, if you don't work out/strengthen your legs/knee regularly, your even more prone.

Good info James! :thumb:
 

James

Staff member
Maybe the good doc is working on a patent for his custom dual braces for his... :foul:... nope, not going there. Sorry, he ticks me off :rant:, can you tell. :lol:.

Seriously, I hope this study will motivate more riders to move towards making a good brace/guard combo a staple in their riding gear, as preventative knee support. After going through a severe knee injury, it's not something you want to experience and doesn't take much force, twisting, or impact to blow your knee out. And, if you don't work out/strengthen your legs/knee regularly, your even more prone.
:devil: Nope. :P

Yeah you, I, and many others have always "known" that knee braces do actually help, however as you probably remember Dr. Mark was against them. He has now changed his mind. :smirk:
 
:devil: Nope. :P

Yeah you, I, and many others have always "known" that knee braces do actually help, however as you probably remember Dr. Mark was against them. He has now changed his mind. :smirk:
And always remember, it takes a big man to admit he was wrong but, it takes an even bigger man to laugh at the man who is admitting he is wrong....:prof:


:smirk:
 
:devil: Nope. :P

Yeah you, I, and many others have always "known" that knee braces do actually help, however as you probably remember Dr. Mark was against them. He has now changed his mind. :smirk:

On one issue, maybe more will follow. :smirk:


And always remember, it takes a big man to admit he was wrong but, it takes an even bigger man to laugh at the man who is admitting he is wrong....:prof:


:smirk:
:smirk:
Strategic Incompetence


Recent abstract...

http://www.kfdm.com/articles/medical-41522-texas-board.html

Statement below within the article (above):

Sanders, Mark Seltzer, M.D., Lic. No. H0002, Houston
On February 4, 2011, the Board and Mark Seltzer Sanders, M.D., entered into a Mediated Agreed Order requiring Dr. Sanders to complete within one year an anger management course; complete within one year 10 hours of CME including five hours in physician/patient relations and five hours in ethics; and pay an administrative penalty of $3,000 within 90 days. The Board found Dr. Sanders behaved in a disruptive manner when he tossed a piece of surgical equipment in the operating room and inadvertently struck an x-ray student; and failed to establish a proper physician-patient relationship when he offered advice by way of an Internet blog.



CME=Continuing Medical Courses


:thinking:
 

James

Staff member
http://www.kfdm.com/articles/medical-41522-texas-board.html

Statement below within the article (above):

Sanders, Mark Seltzer, M.D., Lic. No. H0002, Houston
On February 4, 2011, the Board and Mark Seltzer Sanders, M.D., entered into a Mediated Agreed Order requiring Dr. Sanders to complete within one year an anger management course; complete within one year 10 hours of CME including five hours in physician/patient relations and five hours in ethics; and pay an administrative penalty of $3,000 within 90 days. The Board found Dr. Sanders behaved in a disruptive manner when he tossed a piece of surgical equipment in the operating room and inadvertently struck an x-ray student; and failed to establish a proper physician-patient relationship when he offered advice by way of an Internet blog.
I've always wondered about that.
 
On one issue, maybe more will follow. :smirk:




:smirk:
Strategic Incompetence


Recent abstract...

http://www.kfdm.com/articles/medical-41522-texas-board.html

Statement below within the article (above):

Sanders, Mark Seltzer, M.D., Lic. No. H0002, Houston
On February 4, 2011, the Board and Mark Seltzer Sanders, M.D., entered into a Mediated Agreed Order requiring Dr. Sanders to complete within one year an anger management course; complete within one year 10 hours of CME including five hours in physician/patient relations and five hours in ethics; and pay an administrative penalty of $3,000 within 90 days. The Board found Dr. Sanders behaved in a disruptive manner when he tossed a piece of surgical equipment in the operating room and inadvertently struck an x-ray student; and failed to establish a proper physician-patient relationship when he offered advice by way of an Internet blog.



CME=Continuing Medical Courses


:thinking:
Very interesting....

One things for sure. You would never see this info over at TT.
 
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