I think my front forks are blown :cry:

Well i was riding my wr400 the other day and someone said that my front forks are blown :pout: and i've never worked on forks befor, don't think it could be that hard to fix but i am open to suggestions and any input that you all may have for me :thumb: i'm not sure if i should try putin stiffer springs or not :thinking: what do you think, any and all suggestions would be helpfull:prof:
 
Which fork leg abd how bad of a leak. In general leaks on the brake side must be dealt with. If it's on the other side you might be able to get a few rides. In general unless oil is splooging all over the floor in puddles the leaks are actually pretty small.

Doing the job yourself does take some special tools. A seal driver can be made or bought. Some forks require a holder to get them apart and/or together.
 
i dont think it actually leaks (unless things changed since i last seen it) but its just that they area really really soft.
 
yea they don't seem to be leaking butthey are really really soft . i think i got the bike that way i don't know if there is even oil in the forks for all i know may have leaked out befor i got it , or maybe i broke a spring?? i dont know but something is wrong i know that :prof:
 
some said something about shimms, that if you put some shimms in you can get them a little stiffer:noidea:
 
I can tell you that if you ride every other weekend or so that after a year the fluid in your shocks is shot and will come out looking like mud. It's not that bad of a mission to do it yourself and you will usually put a heavier weight fluid than stock in to get better performance. This is the route I went. On my standard Showa forks I had to make a speacial tool by welding a nut on the end of a pipe to hold the cartridge so I could get the forks apart. Depending on your forks you might need a few more special tools.

I would first suggest checking the clicker adjustments and putting them to full in. If you have never messed with them then you have no idea that they may be set to super soft. Good Luck.
 
I can tell you that if you ride every other weekend or so that after a year the fluid in your shocks is shot and will come out looking like mud. It's not that bad of a mission to do it yourself and you will usually put a heavier weight fluid than stock in to get better performance. This is the route I went. On my standard Showa forks I had to make a speacial tool by welding a nut on the end of a pipe to hold the cartridge so I could get the forks apart. Depending on your forks you might need a few more special tools.

I would first suggest checking the clicker adjustments and putting them to full in. If you have never messed with them then you have no idea that they may be set to super soft. Good Luck.
Thx rock , i've never messed with them befor i hope i don't have to rebiuld them cuz i'm low on funds and if i can change the oil that would be awsome :thumb: now to get the oil out:thinking: :shocked::lol:
 
Go you tube and look up "How to change your fork seals" for the name and type of fork you have. They will show you exactly what to do and how to do it. Just check the clickers first. There should be some on the bottom of the fork and the top. What kind of fork do you have? What bike?
 
It's a 98 wr400 , didn't know there was one on the bottom too, i went and got the manual after i got the bike i just need to read it but sometimes the manual doesn't always tell you the little trix of the trade tipe thing
 
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